Weilding

Full title: Lester Dobbey (#R-16237) v. William Weilding, et al.

Court: United States District Court, Northern District of Illinois

Date published: Feb 20, 2013

Facts

Plaintiff, Lester Dobbey, presently in state custody at Stateville Correctional Center, has brought this pro se civil rights action pursuant to 42 U.S.C. § 1983. Plaintiff alleges ongoing exposure to unconstitutional conditions of confinement at Stateville, including diseased birds that chirp loudly in the early morning hours and defecate throughout the cell house where he is confined, mice that eat the commissary purchased food he maintains in his cell, roaches, and spiders. The plaintiff also alleges that the fluorescent lighting is excessive and interferes with his ability to sleep at night. The plaintiff further alleges that the cellhouse and showers are unsanitary and he is not provided cleaning supplies regularly to combat the filth. Plaintiff alleges ongoing mold exposure, lead, and radium (in the water), as well as inadequate heat in extreme cold conditions. The plaintiff alleges that as a result of his exposure to these unconstitutional conditions, his health has deteriorated. Plaintiff alleges that he made Defendants Weilding, Studer, and Hardy aware of the unconstitutional conditions and they have done nothing to abate the conditions.

Issue

Decision

The plaintiff is instructed to file all future papers concerning this action with the Clerk of Court in care of the Prisoner Correspondent. The plaintiff must provide the Court with the original plus a complete judge’s copy, including any exhibits, of every document filed. In addition, Plaintiff must send an exact copy of any Court filing to Defendant [or to defense counsel, once an attorney has entered an appearance on behalf of Defendants]. Every document filed with the Court must include a certificate of service stating to whom exact copies were mailed and the date of mailing. Any paper that is sent directly to the judge or that otherwise fails to comply with these instructions may be disregarded by the Court or returned to the Plaintiff.

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